Nezu Museum

The Nezu Museum (根津美術館, Nezu bijutsukan), formerly known as the Nezu Institute of Fine Arts, is an art museum in the Minato district of Tokyo, Japan. In addition, some events may be canceled or postponed. The Nezu Museum, dedicated to a vast collection of over 7,400 works of Japanese and East Asian art, synthesizes traditional art forms, modern Japanese architecture, and a Japanese landscape garden into one harmonious complex. The reconstructed building, which opened in 2009, was designed by internationally renowned architect Kengo Kuma. Find a moment of peace while ambling along the garden paths surrounded by ponds, streams, garden lanterns and well-preserved tea houses.Tangible Cultural Property (Tokyo metropolitan area)Copyright © Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau. An educational as well as fun-filled experience is what the destination offers. Nezu Museumspecialise in pre-modern Japanese and East Asian art, with amotto of preserving these art forms and artefacts the place came into being. The Nezu Museum is a cultural and scenic highlight of Tokyo's fashionable Aoyama district, combining sweeping modern architecture with elegant traditional landscaping. All rights reserved.The Nezu Museum, dedicated to a vast collection of over 7,400 works of Japanese and East Asian art, synthesizes traditional art forms, modern Japanese architecture, and a Japanese landscape garden into one harmonious complex. The Nezu Museum collection is of pre-modern Japanese and East Asian art, acquired mainly by Kaichiro Nezu (1860-1940), president of the Tobu Railway, thr… The museum was originally commissioned by Nezu Kaichiro, a Japanese industrialist and passionate art lover and collector, and opened its doors for the first time in 1941. The Museum is at the end of the upmarket Omotesandoboulevard. There are many ancient and historical artefacts that you might like to see in the place. The Nezu Museum is an oasis in Aoyama, with a beautiful museum building, a large and lovely garden to wander around and an excellent cafe in a glass box at the top of the garden with great views over... Nezu Museum's bamboo lined entrance welcomes you into a wonderful exhibit of ancient Japanese, Chinese and Korean art. This serene museum in the Aoyama district, redesigned by celebrated architect Kengo Kuma, is a contemporary temple for traditional art. Wikipedia articles with CINII identifiersArticles containing Japanese-language textWikipedia articles with WorldCat identifiersShort description is different from WikidataWikipedia articles with SUDOC identifiersBuildings and structures in Minato, TokyoThe museum houses the private collection of pre-modern Japanese and East Asian art of Buildings and structures in Japan destroyed during World War IIhttps://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nezu_Museum&oldid=956638685Location of The Nezu Museum in Tokyo, JapanList of National Treasures of Japan (writings)Closed due to large-scale renovation and renewal from 2006 onwards, the museum re-opened in fall 2009 with a completely new museum building by the Japanese architect Included in the collection are a pair of Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike LicenseList of National Treasures of Japan (paintings) Please check official facility or event websites for the latest updates and information.See something interesting? Japanese Bathing Culture Uncovered—A Guide to SentoIf a scheduled closing falls on a public holiday, the facility will remain open on the holiday and close the next day.The wide range of works in the permanent collection include, calligraphy, painting, ceramics and textiles, with a strong focus on Buddhist art. *The museum admission fee is required for use of the garden and cafe. 6-5-1 Minami Aoyama, Minato City, Tokyo As well as the art, there is the expansive Japanese garden, which is a reason in itself to visit. Special exhibitions change every four to six weeks.In order to view this website correctly, you will need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.For updated information on opening hours, closings, prices, and more, please check the official website or ask the facility directly.In order to prevent the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19), various facilities around Tokyo may change their operating days or hours. Click on the heart button in the article to add a page from this site to My Favorites.